SIDEBAR

Net-casting Spider

Jun 04 2013

      In April this year, on a night walk near Agumbe, we came across this spider.   It looked very different from what I’d seen before. Also, the web caught my attention and I photographed it from a couple of different angles to try and capture the essence.   After I got back, the photograph was safely backed up in my hard drives along with the rest of the images from the trip and life went on. Until, I was running through the trip photographs with a friend a month later. When he saw the image, he jumped […]

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Danger lurks

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Nov 30 2011
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Flowers are a plant’s advertisement to insects. As the insects draw nectar from the flower, the flower deposits some pollen on the insect.  When the insect flies to another flower (on another plant), the pollen is deposited on that flower thereby fertilizing it. As insects (like butterflies, flies and bees) are attracted to a flowering plant, predators like this jumping spider (Telamonia dimidiata) use their natural camouflage to wait in the flower for the opportunity to grab their next meal. Jumping Spiders don’t spin webs to catch their prey. They are, instead, active hunters that also count stealth as one […]

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Welcome to my lair

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Nov 25 2011
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Just after the rains on an early morning stroll in a garden, you’ll encounter countless webs of the Grass Funnel Web Spider (Hippasa greenillae), glistening with the raindrops. They spin their webs across blades of grass, with a “funnel” somewhere in the middle that leads to the spider’s lair. This spider was waiting patiently at the entrance of the funnel for any unfortunate prey that may pay a visit. If the spider is threatened, the funnel also acts as a good hiding place for the spider. Photographed near The Valley School, Bangalore.

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Lynx Spiderlings

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Nov 02 2011

A walk through the rainforest at night is an experience to cherish. The darkness around you, with the huge trees, creates a certain mystery. Drops of water falling from the canopy add their melody. So do the manifold crickets, frogs and other species that call this their home. A couple of days ago, the night trail at Agumbe held a more silent surprise. We came across a Lynx Spider (Oxyopes sp.) under some leaves. It was sitting on a white “hanging” that was attached to a web. Initially, it seemed that the spider had stumbled upon the prey of another […]

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