SIDEBAR

Bicolored Frog

Jun 21 2012

Bicolored Frog (Clinotarsus curtipes or Rana curtipes) This is a Near Threatened species of frog that is endemic to the Western Ghats in South-West India. I’ve always seen it under rich rainforest canopy in the leaf litter where its camouflage makes it difficult to spot…unless it moves.   Photographed in Agumbe in June 2012

READ MORE

Bicolored Frog

Jun 21 2012

Bicolored Frog (Clinotarsus curtipes or Rana curtipes) This is a Near Threatened species of frog that is endemic to the Western Ghats in South-West India. I’ve always seen it under rich rainforest canopy in the leaf litter where its camouflage makes it difficult to spot…unless it moves.   Photographed in Agumbe in June 2012

READ MORE

Bicolored Frog

Jun 21 2012

Bicolored Frog (Clinotarsus curtipes or Rana curtipes) This is a Near Threatened species of frog that is endemic to the Western Ghats in South-West India. I’ve always seen it under rich rainforest canopy in the leaf litter where its camouflage makes it difficult to spot…unless it moves.   Photographed in Agumbe in June 2012

READ MORE

Bicolored Frog

Jun 21 2012

Bicolored Frog (Clinotarsus curtipes or Rana curtipes) This is a Near Threatened species of frog that is endemic to the Western Ghats in South-West India. I’ve always seen it under rich rainforest canopy in the leaf litter where its camouflage makes it difficult to spot…unless it moves.   Photographed in Agumbe in June 2012

READ MORE

Beddome’s Keelback

Jun 20 2012

Beddome’s Keelback or Nilgiri Keelback (Amphiesma beddomei) This snake, belonging to the family Colubidae, is an endemic of the Western Ghats extending upto the Nilgiris. They are non-venemous terrestrial snakes. The white spot at the back of the head in the juvenile disappears as the snake grows into an adult. Photographed at Agumbe in June, 2012

READ MORE

Beddome’s Keelback

Jun 20 2012

Beddome’s Keelback or Nilgiri Keelback (Amphiesma beddomei) This snake, belonging to the family Colubidae, is an endemic of the Western Ghats extending upto the Nilgiris. They are non-venemous terrestrial snakes. The white spot at the back of the head in the juvenile disappears as the snake grows into an adult. Photographed at Agumbe in June, 2012

READ MORE

Vine snake on a vine

1 comment
Dec 01 2011
Post's featued image.

The Green Vine Snake (Ahaetulla nasuta) relies on its colour to camouflage itself from prey and predator. Common at Agumbe, they are often seen waiting patiently for prey to come along. They have been known to feed on other snakes and small birds too. They are mildly venomous to humans. When agitated, however, the snake reveals a lot more colors. It breaks into a checkerboard pattern and opens its mouth wide trying to scare away the intruder. When the threat passes by, they swiftly move through the branches to a more secure location.

READ MORE

Lynx Spiderlings

8 comments
Nov 02 2011

A walk through the rainforest at night is an experience to cherish. The darkness around you, with the huge trees, creates a certain mystery. Drops of water falling from the canopy add their melody. So do the manifold crickets, frogs and other species that call this their home. A couple of days ago, the night trail at Agumbe held a more silent surprise. We came across a Lynx Spider (Oxyopes sp.) under some leaves. It was sitting on a white “hanging” that was attached to a web. Initially, it seemed that the spider had stumbled upon the prey of another […]

READ MORE