SIDEBAR

Target acquired…locked…and…

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Nov 08 2013

    It is always the element of surprise that makes wildlife photography thrilling. Like this sequence of a Montagu’s Harrier trying to find breakfast on a warm October morning at Tal Chapar. Can you guess how long this whole sequence would’ve lasted?   Harriers are winter migrants to the Indian subcontinent and are among the most graceful birds in a grassland. These birds of prey can be seen gliding gently a few metres above the ground scanning for prey. They are, in fact, so slow at times that it seems they would land on the ground soon. When they […]

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Bonelli’s Eagle at a water-hole – Part 2

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Oct 19 2012

    Continued from Part 1 of the story…   The Bonelli’s Eagle had settled down at the water-hole and seemed to be enjoying its place in the water.   From time to time, birds like House Crows (Corvus splendens) and Green Sandpipers (Tringa ochropus) would try to mob it to get it away from the water. After a few unsuccessful attempts, they too gave up. In a couple of instances, Green Sandpipers actually walked around nonchalantly in front of the Eagle.   Given that the Eagle was standing on one leg in water, it wouldn’t be able to get […]

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Bonelli’s Eagle at a water-hole – Part 1

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Oct 12 2012

    It started off just like another afternoon drive into the grasslands at Tal Chapar. Hoopoes and Eurasian Collared Doves were their usual busy selves – feeding, flying, preening. An occasional Harrier flew low over the grasslands looking for a potential snack.   We decided to check out the ponds within the park. The early October afternoon was still pretty warm and there was a chance of seeing some activity at the pond. ¬†As we approached one of the ponds, we came across a Bonelli’s Eagle (Aquila fasciata) on the embankment.   After scrutinizing its surroundings, it ¬†decided to […]

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Eastern Imperial Eagle – Juvenile

Aug 06 2012

Eastern Imperial Eagle (Aquila heliaca) This large eagle is a winter visitor to parts of North-Western India. A winter visitor from Europe and Central Asia, this majestic bird is seen in Rajasthan and Gujarat. The image is that of a juvenile bird. It had just finished quarreling with a Red-headed Vulture and settled on the tree to warm itself up in the rising sun. This bird was photographed in Tal Chapar Wildlife Sanctuary, Rajasthan on November 21, 2010.

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Red-headed Vulture – Juvenile

Aug 06 2012

Red-headed Vulture (Sarcogyps calvus) Also known as the Asian King Vulture, this magnificent vulture was a very common sight in India a couple of decades ago. As with many other vulture species, their numbers have fallen (dramatically is an understatement) due to excessive use of the veterinary drug Diclofenac, which is highly poisonous for the birds. Juveniles, like this one, are invaluable for the survival of this species. This one would take around 3 to 4 years to assume adult plumage (pink head and dark wings). This bird was photographed in Tal Chapar Wildlife Sanctuary on November 21, 2010.

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Red-headed Vulture – Juvenile

Aug 06 2012

Red-headed Vulture (Sarcogyps calvus) Also known as the Asian King Vulture, this magnificent vulture was a very common sight in India a couple of decades ago. As with many other vulture species, their numbers have fallen (dramatically is an understatement) due to excessive use of the veterinary drug Diclofenac, which is highly poisonous for the birds. Juveniles, like this one, are invaluable for the survival of this species. This one would take around 3 to 4 years to assume adult plumage (pink head and dark wings). This bird was photographed in Tal Chapar Wildlife Sanctuary on November 21, 2010.

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